Design Post for May 19

I am assuming that a learner’s initial interaction with the space is curiosity about what the printer is doing and the propensity for people to read colorful, attractive posters. I’m also assuming that an area set aside with predominately non-computer equipment will draw some interest from people, especially if it is labelled with a banner or sign with “Creation Corner” or something similar. Seeing the printer in action, I am assuming, will draw at least some people to learn more about it.

While interviewing people, I asked what they would print if they had access to a 3D printer. While many of the responses were quite similar, essentially just printing out a personal tchotchke, some responses were personal and unique. Using these unique responses as demonstration pieces (e.g eyeglass frame, shoes, bow & arrow), place them out in an area where people can see and touch them and be informed that they were created by students for various uses. (No need to worry about them walking away, more can just be printed.)

The experience could look like this: A student in the library walks past the display case and sees something interesting. Above it, there’s a poster which says that the piece is a model of an engine and is moveable. She picks it up, moves the pistons around a bit, seeing how they interact with other parts and thinks “that’s pretty neat”. The sign nearby explains that another student used this is a class presentation as a visual aid instead of just a drawing. While this is does not immediately cause her to do anything, the next day while she is eating lunch with group members, she mentions the device she saw. Other people’s curiosity is piqued, and she heads back to the library later to talk to the librarian about the 3D printer in the crafting room. There, she is exposed to other crafting and making resources, which she may or may not look at immediately, but will be exposed to through her use of the printer.

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